Andreian https://andreian.com Ancient Honor | Modern Conquerors Thu, 19 Apr 2018 02:06:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://https://andreian.com?v=4.9.5 https://andreian.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/cropped-ios-icon-114-32x32.png Andreian https://andreian.com 32 32 129367435 The Four Noble Truths Of The Buddha https://andreian.com/the-four-noble-truths-of-the-buddha/ https://andreian.com/the-four-noble-truths-of-the-buddha/#respond Thu, 19 Apr 2018 02:06:06 +0000 https://andreian.com/?p=3701 The Four Noble Truths Of The Buddha This is a guest post by Regan from refinedmindset.com Buddhism is one of the most ancient and popular spiritual paths. Buddhism provides a path to spiritual enlightenment without some of the uncomfortable shackles associated with organized Religion. However, Buddhism denies no belief system and claims no superiority of […]

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The Four Noble Truths Of The Buddha


This is a guest post by Regan from refinedmindset.com


Buddhism is one of the most ancient and popular spiritual paths.

Buddhism provides a path to spiritual enlightenment without some of the uncomfortable shackles associated with organized Religion. However, Buddhism denies no belief system and claims no superiority of its own…

Instead, Buddhism invites you to look within for spiritual answers; beyond bias and prejudice.

The primary aim behind Buddhism is to relieve the spiritual aspirant from his or her suffering.

The story goes, that, before enlightenment, Buddha was known as Prince Siddhartha. He belonged to a royal family and was afforded every luxury life could offer.

Additionally, his athletic skills were superior to his peers and his intellect was unmatched among those his age.

Siddhartha had it made. He was the kind of guy that other men wished they were and all women desired.

However, as Prince Siddhartha approached his late twenties, he became restless and wanted to see what was outside the walls of his castle and all of its comforts. Life, even with all of its endless pleasures, was becoming dull to the young genius.

He took multiple trips outside the walls in the coming days. Each trip brought something disturbing to the young Prince’s attention.

On his first trip outside the walls, he saw an individual suffering from disease. On his second trip, he saw an individual suffering from the pains of old age. And, on his third trip, he saw someone who had passed away and became subject to death.

As Prince Siddhartha returned to his comfortable life, he grew disturbed by what he had saw. Soon, Siddhartha’s inner disturbance and curiosity came to a boiling point and in the silence of the night–he left his castle vowing never to return unless he found life beyond suffering and death.

After six years of wandering, meditation, and severe asceticism, Buddha is said to have gone beyond death and suffering and entered into Nirvana—a state of joy, ecstasy, and timeless bliss.

However, Buddha didn’t just attain Nirvana for himself; he traced his footsteps back and highlighted the most epochal steps of his journey so that we too, could attain Nirvana.

What Buddha brought back to the world was  four noble truths. If you can understand the four noble truths of the Buddha, you will be well on your way to Nirvana—the land where pain and suffering are replaced for ecstasy and bliss.

The four noble truths of the Buddha

Like Reagan’s work? Visit Refinedmind.

#1. Life Is Suffering Because All Of Life Is Change


“Don’t get selfishly attached to anything, for trying to hold onto it will bring you pain. When you have neither likes nor dislikes, you will be free – The Dhammapada V.211”


The common thread between the disturbances Siddhartha saw on his journey outside the walls was impermanence.

Health, happiness, and pleasure are all subject to time and change—to rise and fall. Death or disease can strike us at any moment and decay tears away at our youth and vigor day by day.

The Buddha also noticed that all things which give rise to pleasure leave pain in their wake. The more one indulges in the present moment, the more they would suffer in the near future.

Think alcohol, fast food, or porn use giving rise to hangovers, weight gain, and lowered motivation and happiness.

To overcome suffering, Buddha states that we must transcend the desire for anything subject to change. However, if we follow the path of the Buddha, eventually, we come to realize that nothing on Earth is permanent…All of life is change.

We must find contentment within; the one true constant. To do this, we are recommended to follow the eightfold path of the Dharma (below).

#2. Selfish Desire Is The Root Of Suffering


Buddha’s view that all of life is suffering seems dark. However, in his teachings, Buddha  elaborates: it is not because of life itself that we suffer, but because of the demands we make on life.

How many people do you know that are content with whatever life brings to them?

Likely you, and everyone you know have ideas of a better life. We strive for these ideals and postpone our happiness until we get there. Additionally, any obstacle that sets us back on our path to these ideals causes more resistance, stress, and unhappiness.

What we don’t often see is that the destination is never ending…

When we arrive at our ideals, after much struggling and suffering, we conjure up a new ideal–forgetting our earlier promises to be happy now that we are here, we set off on a new journey and once again delay our arrival.

While we believe we are advancing—and we may very well be on a material level—we are spiritually deteriorating.

Buddha insists that we need nothing to be happy. If we truly wish to be happy, we should only desire to desire less.

Keep in mind this doesn’t need to limit your ambitions. You shouldn’t wait to begin being happy. If you do, you set yourself up for failure, discontent, and greed.

The more selfish your goals are the more they will cause you to suffer. If your ambition is aligned with helping others before yourself, then ambition is a noble trait.

Pleasure


Selfish desire further brings pain because it gives rise to the need for pleasure and gratification.

If we discipline ourselves to avoid pleasure, knowing it eventually gives rise to pain, we can transcend the constant cycle of duality. Instead, we find ourselves rewarded by ever-increasing health, vitality, and joy.

Gratification of desire gives rise to pain. Discipline gives rise to Nirvana.

#3. Any Ailment That Can Be Understood Can Be Overcome


 

Karma states: every thought and action has a predetermined consequence of the same nature.

Good thoughts and actions produce good results. And, evil or negative behaviors will only bring negative and evil results.

We don’t need an eternal judge to reward or punish us but, instead, we are the makers of our happiness or misery.

Negative karma is accumulated from the gratification of selfish desires. Where there is no clinging to desire there can only be positive karma.

Buddha states that if we wish to transcend our suffering, we must burn through the negative karma we have accumulated throughout our life.

However, the Buddha is not shy to say this is a tedious process. We must overcome evil and attain the highest good little by little “as a bucket is filled with water drop by drop”.

Although spiritual, there isn’t much mysticism behind the four noble truths of Buddhism. Instead, The Four Noble Truths boil down to making better choices and slowly destroying bad habits, thoughts, and desires that detract from the highest good.

The ailments you face are a result of little drops accumulated in a bucket over long periods. Once you understand this, you can begin to empty your bucket–Drop by drop.

 

#4. Suffering is Overcome By Following The Eightfold Path Of The Dharma


The final step of the four noble truths of Buddhism is the most elaborate. It is the eightfold path of Dharma.

The Dharma is considered by the Buddha as “the way” or “the path”. 

 

To follow the Dharma and attain Nirvana, we must train ourselves in the following:

Right Understanding


All of life is change. Anything subject to change gives rise to suffering when idolized.

We must transcend selfish desires and discipline the mind with diligence and the utmost resolve.

Right Purpose


“Better than ruling this world, better than attaining the realm of the Gods, better than being Lord of all the worlds, is one step taken on the path to Nirvana – The Dhammapada V.178.


A follower of the Buddha’s highest purpose is to take one step towards Nirvana daily. 

This can be accomplished by practicing the other seven steps of the Dharma.

Right Speech


Let only good words come out of your mouth so that they may benefit those who hear. As you treat others well, karma states others will treat you with the same respect.

Right Conduct


“Better to live in goodness and wisdom for one day than to lead an ignorant and undisciplined life for 100 years – The Dhammapada V.112”


Harm no living creature; including yourself. The Buddha says it is a human’s duty to help all of life.

The spiritual aspirant’s conduct does not revolve around reward or praise but is governed by an understanding of karma.

Right Occupation


Use your talents and skills to help those around you as best as you can. As you contribute to society, you will find purpose and success. Discipline will also become second nature when it is for a noble cause greater than oneself.

Right Effort


“The earnest spiritual aspirant, fearing sloth, advances like a fire, burning all fetters – The Dhammapada V.31”


The spiritual aspirant in search of Nirvana is told to burn laziness in fire.

Every day is an opportunity to make progress towards the goal, even if only minor. To waste a single day in laziness is a grave mistake.

Right Attention


As we seek out righteousness we must keep our eyes on what is good and true.

Do not conform to society’s patterns and short attention spans. Instead, keep your eyes on the prize so you have good reason to keep running the race.

Right Meditation


“More than those who hate you, more than all your enemies, an undisciplined mind does greater harm – The Dhammapada V.42”


Lastly, we must train our minds knowing an undisciplined mind is more threatening than the most ferocious army.

The trained mind goes beyond death and suffering and reaches Nirvana to dwell in peace forever.

Meditation is considered the highest spiritual practice in Buddhism—as well as many other spiritual beliefs.

In meditation, one finds discipline, peace, and truth beyond external opinion and bias. If you wish to follow the Dharma to its end destination of Nirvana, you must make meditation a major foundation of your life.

Final Thoughts


If you wish to transcend suffering and enter into a state of permanent well-being, the four noble truths of buddhism lay in the open for you to experiment with.

Based on my experiences interpreting these truths into my own life, I guarantee that you have far more to gain than lose by following the Dharma.

For anyone wishing to reach the other shore; Buddha is waiting.

More From Regan:


Regan is the author of Man’s Guide to Well-Being (currently free) and RefinedMindset.com.

After overcoming a decades worth of anxiety and depression, Regan loves to write about the natural methods that anyone can use to overcome these same issues. His interests include reading, writing, being outdoors, and growing as an individual.

He has also written other posts for the Andreian community such as:

Destructive Words To Eliminate From Your Life

and

There’s A New Predator In The Kingdom

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Quotes & Passages from Hagakure: The Book Of The Samurai https://andreian.com/hagakure-quotes/ https://andreian.com/hagakure-quotes/#respond Wed, 18 Apr 2018 19:33:20 +0000 https://andreian.com/?p=3729 Hagakure: The Book of the Samurai | Introduction kindle | Paperback | Hardcover | Audible (free) Hagakure Sections Quotes Passages Some passages have insight into the modern world where applicable. Hagakure Kikigaki, also known as Hagakure, is a book of Samurai wisdom written more than 300 years ago by Yamamoto Tsunetomo, a clerk who served […]

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quotes and passages from hagakure-book of the samurai

Hagakure: The Book of the Samurai | Introduction

quotes from hagakure

kindle | Paperback | Hardcover | Audible (free)

Hagakure Sections

Some passages have insight into the modern world where applicable.

Hagakure Kikigaki, also known as Hagakure, is a book of Samurai wisdom written more than 300 years ago by Yamamoto Tsunetomo, a clerk who served during the age of the Samurai underneath Nabeshima Mitsushige–A Japanese Daimyo. Daimyo is a term for a Feudal leader; someone who possessed land; similar to a King in Feudal society during the middle ages.

Hagakure is broken up into 11 books. But you can’t tell. All of Hagakure is roughly 200 pages depending on the translation. The different books feel like different conversations between the Samurai. You’ll see, many pieces of wisdom are repeated, or contradicted.

Yamamoto Tsunetomo was a Samurai: a servant to a lord. Not all Samurai fought in battle. Yamamoto didn’t. Instead, he served his lord, Nabeshima Mitsushige, and did whatever his Daimyo required of him.

Hagakure is a series of insights; wisdom passed down from Lord Nabeshima Mitsushige to Yamamoto Tsunetomo. Even though Yamamoto Tsunetomo is the author of Hagakure, he didn’t compile the wisdom into a book. Yamamoto Tsunetomo engaged in conversation with a man who very little is known about: Tashiro Tsuramoto. This man compiled the conversations with Yamamoto into the book Hagakure we now have today. Actually, we can credit most of the book to Tashiro for compiling Hagakure.

Hagakure translates to Hidden Leaves, or hidden by the leaves. This naming convention is in reference to the hidden wisdom of the Samurai that few understand or acknowledge.

Hagakure was written during a time of peace. Samurai, meaning warrior, were the warrior-class of the era during Tsunetomo’s life. During this time the Samurai didn’t have much purpose–dueling was banned–as was Seppuku–ritual suicide.

It was common for a Samurai to follow their master in death by committing ritual suicide. Seppuku, ritual suicide, occurred by slashing open the stomach; believed to allow the soul to travel to heaven so the Samurai could continue serving the master.

Nabeshima Mitsushige, Yamamoto Tsunetomo’s master–hated ritual suicide, outlawing the practice in his domain. Because of this ban, Yamamoto Tsunetomo, at the event of his master’s death, committed to being a hermit for the rest of his life. At this period Tsunetomo penned Hagakure: his attempt to spread Samurai wisdom and the true Samurai way to younger Samurai. He believed many Samurai were lost; living without honor because of the lack of discipline in the current era and the banning of duals and ritual suicides.

Samurai believe death was the answer in all circumstances. You’ll see throughout the book, recommendations of death instead of living. A good death was the aspiration of all great Samurai.

Hagakure was written during a strange time for the Samurai. Dueling was outlawed. No wars were fought. And ritual suicide was outlawed. The Samurai based much of their lives on the premise of sacrificing their lives for their master at a moment’s notice.

Hagakure is a book of wisdom for the Samurai. It is a book of honor. Much of the advice listed within will not apply to modern life. But, many quotes and passages from Hagakure do translate to living a good life today.

Hagakure is a wonderful book and a fascinating look into the minds of some of the greatest warriors to have ever lived. It’s cheap to buy, and, if you look for a few minutes online, you can likely find a free but outdated copy of Hagakure. The copy listed above is a dependable translation.

We’ve read Hagakure, front to back and compiled quotes and passages valuable to the warrior on the path to a greater life today. The quotes are roughly in order of the book. Enjoy.

Hagakure Quotes

Yamamoto Tsunetomo hagakure quotes
Yamamoto Tsunetomo

Quote 1

As is usually the case with a man’s training, one will not succeed without being haughtily believing in your true worth as a man of service.

Quote 2

Relying only on cleverness and talents [devoid of single-minded devotion] is a lower form of service.

Quote 3

We can tap into knowledge that serves to steer us away from egotism by studying the aphorisms and deeds of the ancients.

Quote 4

This world is full of cowardly, spineless men who think only of self-gratification and satisfying their own greedy desires.

Quote 5

Presenting one’s opinions to others to help them rectify their faults is an important act of great compassion, and is the duty of a retainer.

Quote 6

In offering one’s opinion, one must first ascertain whether or not the recipient is in the right frame of mind to receive counsel.

Quote 7

If a bad habit has become ingrained over many years, it cannot be remedied easily.

Quote 8

It is good practice to think things through when going to visit somebody.

Quote 9

It is generally best to avoid visiting somebody unexpectedly when you have no business there.

Quote 10

The prepared warrior is not only able to solve problems in a quick and commendable fashion by virtue of his life experience, but he can react appropriately through his comprehension of measures to meet any scenario. He is always ready.

Quote 11

The pulse of a man is different to that of a woman.

Quote 12

There are few who can be thought of as a real man. This means that one man can surpass others by making just a small effort.

Quote 13

A mind ‘free of thought’ (munen) is one that is pure with ‘correct thought’ (shōnen).”

Quote 14

The point is to have correct thoughts without letting evil thoughts manifest.

Quote 15

Generally, a man who is not of a suitable high standing to speak his mind to his lord, but does so anyway, is disloyal.

Quote 16

Knowing the Way is to know your own faults.

 

Quote 17

Some people like to talk big, but act in a way that doesn’t match their words.

Quote 18

The middle path is generally the best way, but with regards to samurai engaged in martial affairs, this will not do. The samurai must strive to outdo others.

Quote 19

Winning from the outset is the only way to attain victory in the end.

Quote 20

Cowardly behavior learnt during boyhood will remain ingrained as a lifelong flaw.

 

Quote 21

Be clear in stating your opinion if you disagree with what is being said.

Quote 22

be mindful of where you are and who is around you when you are chatting.

Quote 23

You are a coward if you harbor a fear of failure when conducting your duties.

Quote 24

Never spurn a person who has shown you favor in the past.

Quote 25

A samurai’s word is harder than metal. Once I have decided something, not even the gods can change it.

Moro’oka Hiko’uemon 26 year old Samurai at the time of this quote

Quote 26

A calculating man is a coward. This is because he considers everything from the perspective of loss and gain, and his mind never deviates from this track.

Quote 27

One cannot accomplish great exploits in a normal frame of mind.

Quote 28

When challenged by adversity, charge onwards with courage and jubilation.

 

Quote 29

There is no need to reveal all that is on your mind. Your qualities will be apparent through your daily actions.

Quote 30

Nothing is impossible. With single-minded resolve (ichinen), heaven and earth can be moved as one pleases. There is nothing that cannot be achieved.

Quote 31

Be conversant with wise men, and seek lessons in morality from them.

Quote 32

A samurai who does not care much for his reputation tends to be contrary, is conceited, and good-for-nothing. He is inferior to a samurai who craves glory, and is thus completely unusable.

Quote 33

It is a timorous coward who winces at an important task and withdraws because of the danger. If you meet with failure in your mission despite your best efforts, it will be lauded as an honorable death.

Quote 34

Those who revel when times are good will wither in adversity.

Quote 35

Ittei said, “If I were to describe in a word what it means to do ‘good’ as a samurai, it is to withstand hardship. To not endure suffering is sinful.”

Quote 36

According to an old retainer: “A samurai should be excessively obstinate. Anything done in moderation will fall short of your goals. If you feel that you are doing more than is needed, it will be just right.”

Quote 37

You need nothing more than to maintain a pure mind, and stay vigilant as you execute your duties. Just live for each moment with single-minded purpose.

Quote 38

Success gained too early in life will not endure.

Quote 39

The extent of one’s courage or cowardice cannot be measured in ordinary times. All is revealed when something happens.

Quote 40

A man’s life is very short, so it is best to do what he enjoys most.

Quote 41

When someone blathers incessantly, it is probably an indication that something else is on his mind.

Quote 42

The thrust of one’s spear will be ineffective if lacking in fighting spirit.

Quote 43

One cannot advance without great courage.

Quote 44

The more hardship, the better.

Quote 45

There is nothing worse than having regrets. All samurai should take care not to do anything they will repent later.

Quote 46

Anything is achievable through single-minded endeavor (bannō-isshin).

Hagakure Passages

Yamamoto Tsunetomo hagakure passages
Yamamoto Tsunetomo

 Passage 1

A certain man said, “There are two kinds of willpower: internal and external. A man who is deficient in either will be ineffectual. It is like a sword blade that’s sharpened and then stored in its scabbard. Every so often it is unsheathed to test its cutting power on an eyebrow, wiped clean, and then put away again. If a man is constantly swinging his sword about, others will keep their distance, and he will make no friends. A sword always inside its scabbard, however, will rust and become dull. Analogous to this, people will belittle a man who never reveals his power of will.”

Insight: You cannot be a tough-guy all the time. You’ll be unbearable and look weak–like you’re covering a deep insecurity from childhood. On the reversal, never standing up for yourself will make you a target. The prime target. A victim to all.

 Passage 2

Although presumptuous of me as a hermit, one who has taken the holy orders, not once have I desired to attain Buddhahood in death; instead, I only want to be reincarnated seven times as a Nabeshima clansman, with the determination resolutely etched in my gut to uphold the tranquillity of the Saga domain.

 Passage 3

The following is my own professed oath: I will never fall behind others in pursuing the Way of the warrior. I will always be ready to serve my lord. I will honor my parents. I will serve compassionately for the benefit of others. By chanting these four oaths (shiseigan) every morning and night to the deities and to Buddha, you will become imbued with double your strength, and will never lag behind.

Insight: When you’re taking a break someone else is working. Your limits exist to be pushed. This is the way. When you’re about to quit, go a little farther. Push the boundary out. Next time, the line remains to where it was last pushed. You can build an endurance to hard work and sustain much greater loads.

Try saying some affirmations.

 Passage 4

Yawning in the presence of others is impolite. If the urge to yawn suddenly arises, rub your forehead in an upward stroke to suppress it. If this is not enough to restrain the yawn, use the tip of your tongue to lock your lips shut, and cover your gaping mouth with your hand or sleeve to conceal it from others. Sneezes should also be stifled. Sneezes and yawns make you look very silly. There are many other points of etiquette that you should be mindful of at all times.

Insight: Yawning makes you silly. But no one really cares. The advice above works if you feel the urge to control a yawn. The technique may come in handy if your boss is presenting so you don’t seem disinterested.

 Passage 5

Master Jōchō pondered tasks for the coming day and wrote them down. Being organized keeps you a step ahead of others. When scheduled to meet somebody the following day, make a careful assessment the night before, contemplating appropriate greetings, topics of conversation, and points of etiquette.

 Passage 6

Lord Yagyū once said, “I do not know how to defeat others. All I know is the path to defeat myself. Today one must be better than yesterday, and tomorrow better than today. The pursuit of perfection is a lifelong quest that has no end.”

Insight: The path. Your destiny. All you need to do is find what brings you joy and do that skill until you die. What you select must be a skill which can be measured–improvement, measured.

Passage 7

There is a lesson to be learned from a downpour of rain. If you get caught in a sudden cloudburst, you will still get a drenching even though you try to keep dry by hurrying along and taking cover under overhangs of roofs. If you are prepared to get wet from the start, the result is still the same but it is no hardship. This attitude can be applied to all things.

Insight: Don’t be attached to an outcome. Expect nothing and you’ll never be unsatisfied. Quell your desires and tranquility becomes yours.

 Passage 8

It is said: “When you make a mistake, never hesitate to correct it.” A wrongdoing can be rectified immediately if you are quick to address the problem. It will look worse if you try to cover it up, and you will suffer more.

Insight: Problems compound when problems are hidden. Self Authoring is a good way to uncover your hidden problems.

Passage 9

An ancient saying goes: “Think, and decide in seven breaths.” Lord Takanobu commented: “One’s judgement will diminish with prolonged deliberation.” Lord Naoshige said: “Matters decided at a leisurely pace will turn out badly seven times out of ten.

Passage 10

There is no point in one’s training in which one reaches the end. The instant you think you have finished, you have already strayed from the path. Realize that nothing you do is perfect until you have taken your last breath; then, when you are dead, you will be seen as having completed the Way.

Insight: Self fulfillment through accomplishment. The way. An extension of passage six above. Find what you love and let it kill you, as Bukowski would say.
 Passage 11

I kept a diary when I was young, and called it “A Record of Regrets.” In it, I logged the mistakes that I made each day. Not a day passed when I didn’t commit 20 or 30 gaffes. There was no end to what I had to document because of my incessant blundering, so I eventually stopped. Now, when I reflect on each day before retiring, there is not one that is free of slip-ups in word and action. Indeed, it seems that a perfect day is impossible to pull off. Men who wriggle their way through life relying on their talents will fail to grasp this.

Insight: There is no such thing as a perfect day. There is only your ongoing pursuit of perfection that the Samurai chased every day.

 Passage 12

All that matters is having single-minded purpose (ichinen), in the here and now. Life is an ongoing succession of ‘one will’ at a time, each and every moment. A man who realizes this truth need not hurry to do, or seek, anything else anymore. Just live in the present with single-minded purpose. People forget this important truth, and keep seeking other things to accomplish.

 Passage 13

I would proffer to physicians that if people who are sickly suppress their sexual desires for six months, or a year or two, they will recuperate without need of any special treatment. Most young men are weak-willed. It is woeful that they lack willpower to control their carnal urges [for the sake of their wellbeing].

 Passage 14

 

As the saying goes: “The more water there is, the higher the boat rises.” A competent man, or one engrossed in a pursuit he enjoys, will relish the challenge of surmounting difficulties. There is a huge difference between these men, and those who feel as though they are drowning when the going gets tough.

 Insight: Challenge is a blessing, not a curse. You are a boat. Whatever you faced in your past: You’ve overcome. But we forget how strong we are. You can do anything.

Editor’s recommendation

 

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Self Authoring Suite | Reviewing Jordan Peterson’s Self Authoring Program https://andreian.com/self-authoring/ https://andreian.com/self-authoring/#respond Tue, 17 Apr 2018 01:46:43 +0000 https://andreian.com/?p=3632 Self Authoring Overview Purchase the program here The self authoring suite is a compilation of four, interactive writing programs aimed at helping the author–you–understand yourself. Self Authoring has multiple components, each with a goal to help the writer understand their strengths, weaknesses; their past; the crucial memories from the past controlling the present; and, the […]

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self authoring

Self Authoring Overview

Purchase the program here

The self authoring suite is a compilation of four, interactive writing programs aimed at helping the author–you–understand yourself. Self Authoring has multiple components, each with a goal to help the writer understand their strengths, weaknesses; their past; the crucial memories from the past controlling the present; and, the ideal future you want and how you’ll obtain it.

Each Self Authoring program page presents an interactive journaling experience in a question and answer format. In some sections, you’ll be asked to select from a series of traits that apply to you. In others, you write about the traits, or applicable memories, and how they may be affecting your behavior. Sometimes you’ll create a list of traits then order them by their relevance or importance.

The self authoring program teaches you who you are and what you want to be. You can decide what you want; and get it too.

After you finish the program you’re prompted to email or print your results. Do both. You can retake any Self Authoring module later. I recommend waiting at least a year before attempting any of the modules again unless you have additional memories you want to process using the Past Authoring Program.

The cost for the program at the time of this article is 29.99.

it’s worth it.

You can buy individual programs for 15$–a waste of money compared to buying the full self Authoring Suite for 29.99.

There are links to buy the Self Authoring program in this article. We do not benefit from any sales, other than spreading Jordan Peterson’s work.

How Does Self Authoring Work?

Video from the Self Authoring.

People use stories to interpret everything around them. Sigmund Freud theorized the release of emotions around negative experiences could be curative. For example, if a man was beaten as a child, he may manifest this trauma by attacking his family. His feeling of a lack of control in the household contributes to his violent outbursts; he’s never gone back to revisit the memory because of the associated pain. But, once he goes back to the source of the pain, and reprocesses the memory so it no longer haunts him, he’ll no longer act out in a deviant manner towards his family.

Freud’s Self Authoring Experiment

Freud conducted a study similar to the self-authoring program. He asked students to write fifteen minutes per day for three days about the most painful experiences in their lives.

Freud had a control group write about normal everyday experiences using the same fifteen-minute window. The results were clear: the study group had noticeable improvements in their mental health after a subtle dip in their mental being, likely a cause of revisiting the painful traumas of their lives. It’s believed, this is because the memory is reprocessed about what happened to them in the past.

In Past Authoring, a component of the Self Authoring Suite reviewed below, you revisit happy and painful moments in the past for the purpose of reprocessing, like in Freud’s study.

People who complete self-analyzing programs have less misery by articulating and understanding previous life experiences instead of being chained to the emotional response from painful events, sweeping the trauma under the rug, or hiding it in the closet, out of site, while the trauma still lives and, is never resolved.

Update: A representative of Self Authoring reached out to say, Freud wasn’t the first to conduct the initial experiments: James Pennebaker did.

People experience happiness when they progress.

You can’t progress if an experience in your past is controlling your actions, or if you have no clear sense of where you want to be in the future.

The past authoring program allows you to articulate and understand your past, while the future authoring program asks you to create a map of where you want to be, and, how you expect to get there.

When painful memories from the past are transcribed into words, the painful memories move out of the flight or fight section of the brain and move into another section of the brain responsible for comprehension.

Humans fear the unknown.

But, humans also fear revisiting painful experiences–as they should. In practice. Your body wants to keep you alive and thriving; painful experiences are counter to your body’s goal of avoiding pain and seeking pleasure.

Humans are a special kind of animal unlike any other. Often, we need to embrace pain in order to progress because it’s our pain that prevents a good life from sprouting, from the ashes left behind in tragedy, like a forest fire giving birth to new pine trees in the fall.

Most people don’t know who they are; what they’ve been through; or, where they’re going. Most people forget about the painful experiences they’ve endured– they fear the future, forgetting how strong they really are.

Instead of taking action to make their lives better, most people simply wait for life to happen to them, distracting themselves by ‘killing time’, a euphemism for running away from what’s important.

Below is additional information about the creator of the Self Authoring Suite, Dr. Jordan Peterson. Then, individual reviews of each component of the  Program.

Dr. Jordan Peterson | The Creator of the Self Authoring Suite

Jordan Peterson is a former professor of psychology at the University of Toronto in Canada. He became renown for his aggressive stance against the ultra-liberal policies his home country, Canada, has begun enforcing–related to gender politics and free speech.

Canada doesn’t have protection against hate speech. Whereas The United States has clear lines of the citizen rites to free speech, Canada’s distinction is murky. Canada prohibits hate speech, but, it’s not clearly defined what hate speech is.

Jordan Peterson created the Self Authoring Program because he understands you can’t change anyone but yourself. The Self Authoring Program incites personal change so students can change the world through the changes they make in themselves.

Jordan Peterson also released a new book called 12 rules for life: An antidote to Chaos. It’s a number one Amazon Best-Seller. Currently the top-selling book; listed below.self authoring 12 rules jordan peterson

kindle | Hardcover | Paperback | Audiobook (free)

Watch the best Jordan Peterson interviews here, including the famous: “so what you’re saying is?” video.

Self Authoring Suite Components

  1. Present Authoring: Faults
  2. Present Authoring: Virtues
  3. Future Authoring
  4. Past Authoring

Use the links to jump sections. If you get the Self Authoring program, the menu above is a good order for completing the program.

Present Authoring Program: Faults

self authoring suite

Present Authoring Faults: Overview

The faults section of the present authoring program helps the author determine faults that may be holding them back. Faults, meaning aspects of your character which work against your success.

Writing your faults helps to conceptualize them; most people have no understanding of their weaknesses because they’ve never taken the time to analyze them. Or, they fear admitting they may have something wrong with them.

Present Authoring Faults: Process

You begin with a list of faults. Pick the faults most applicable to your life. You’ll later order them by their prevalence.

The available present authoring faults span five categories:

  • Extroversion/introversion
  • Openness/traditionalism
  • Conscientiousness/carelessness
  • Emotional Stability/ Low-Stress Tolerance
  • Agreeable/Assertive

Each category contains a number of faults relating to the parent category.

For example, the faults listed in the Agreeable/Assertive category include:

  • Avoid conflict even when it is necessary.
  • Find myself making excuses for other’s inappropriate behavior.
  • Cannot negotiate for myself very well.
  • Trust people too easily.

There are more faults; about ten negative traits in each parent category available to pick.

After picking faults, you’re asked to author an experience associated with the fault. For example, if you selected: often feel depressed and blue; you’ll write about a memory when feeling depressed and blue negatively affected your life.

After writing about how your fault affected your life, you analyze the situation, then, think about how you can improve this fault–how can you improve so the fault affects your life, less; in general terms.

You’re also asked a possible alternative outcome; what would happen if the fault didn’t exist? Or, how else could you behave so the fault effects you less?

Personal-Example Essay:

This is a response from my Present Authoring Faults Essay. Nothing omitted. 

Often Procrastinate 
  • An experience due to the fault:

“It’s difficult to spend time alone so it’s difficult to get work done. This isn’t a unique story but an overarching trait. Instead of going to my room and killing my to-do-list, I’ll sit in the living room with K*****. I cannot work while a TV is present. I need to spend time alone to be the best version of myself. Community isn’t important: independence is. The negative impact is obvious–no work or progress is made. I stay in the same place because I’m afraid to carry the responsibility I’ve selected.”

  • A possible alternative Outcome:

“Instead of hanging out with others, which I hate doing, I’ll say no. I will say no to people I don’t want to be around. Like people I work with. I want to listen to audiobooks and podcasts, not talk about politics or who did what on their mediocre vacation. I’ll spend more time alone. I’ll tell K***** no, and isolate myself more from the world around me.”

  • Guidelines for General Improvement:

“Literally, saying no to things I don’t want to do and drawing boundaries. Jordan Peterson said: be less agreeable. Stop agreeing to things you don’t like. Whether that is going out, staying in, or associating with others. If there are items in your To-Do-List do them. You know the rules. Follow them now.”

Present Authoring Faults: Program Review

The present Authoring Faults component of the Self Authoring program is brutal.

People hate confronting their weaknesses because no one likes to be reminded of their shortcomings. But, it’s your shortcomings that leave you vulnerable to the calamities of life.

If you don’t know your shortcomings, that doesn’t mean your enemies don’t either. Often, we hide the parts we hate the most from ourselves; others still see our weakness and will exploit any weakness they can find–especially a weakness we don’t know we have, like, the willingness to help a stranger in need, and the stranger, takes advantage of us.

The Faults program is good. Not great; but good. It’s humbling for egotistical people, but, may be hard for anyone with low self-esteem to confront negative traits without understanding what causes them.

The past authoring program will help you understand where your faults come from. Most of them coming from some defense mechanism activated by a childhood trauma you had no control over.

Final Rating: 3 out of 5

Present Authoring Program: Virtues

self authoring 2

Present Authoring Virtues: Overview

The second component of the present authoring program is writing about your virtues; the best traits you possess and the characteristics you rely on the most.

Many of the strengths listed in the virtue program are strengths you haven’t thought about before. They aren’t simple ansers like: I am smart. But, apply to different circumstances and events.

This is a feel-good experience best for people who harbor low self-worth, and, think positive thoughts as often as they see a double rainbow.

Present Authoring Virtues: Process

Pick virtues from the same big five categories listed in Present Authoring: Virtues.

Categories:

  • Extraversion/introversion
  • openness/traditionalism
  • conscientiousness/carelessness
  • emotional stability/low stress tolerance
  • agreeable/assertive

Openness/Traditionalism Virtue Examples:

  • Am full of ideas.
  • Am philosophically inclined.
  • Have excellent ideas.
  • Spent time reflecting on things.
  • Am Entrepreneurial.

Each category has ten traits. The Present Authoring Virtues program is like the nicer, sweeter, parent in the marriage between the virtue program and the faults program.

You’ll pick around 7 traits from each category. Then, you’re asked to distill your virtues to a single trait within each category. The last step is self authoring.

  • How does the selected trait improve you life?
  • How does the trait benefit you?
  • What can you do to acquire more value from the positive trait?

Once you’re finished, your writings are available in an essay format. Same with the rest of the Self Authoring components. You can print or email the essay. Do both.

Later, you can take the Present Authoring Virtues program again, and, select different virtues to learn more about your beneficial traits.

Personal-Example Essay:

This is a response from my Present Authoring Virtues Essay. Nothing omitted. 

Am Very goal oriented
  • An experience due to the positive trait:

“Having my goals listed in Evernote creates a positive benefit to my life. I have all of my goals listed in Evernote in an organized Notebook. I have current goals, and a goal bank where I list interesting challenges I’m open to pursuing. This helps me because it gives me direction on where I want to go–There’s no confusion on my next directive.”

  • A possible alternative outcome:

“I need to stop fearing my goals. Fear is an emotion–it needs to leave. There is nothing to fear, ever, for your goals or your life. All you need to do is the work. Fear makes you procrastinate, fear makes you lazy. All you need to do is follow your rules and soon you’ll be writing novels and hosting the best podcast in the world. But first you must kill fear–and–take exciting risks. Risks make you feel alive and so do risky goals. Not risk in a life-threatening manner, but risk in leaving your comfort zone and doing what you’ve never done before; like writing your first book.”

  • Guidelines for general improvement.

“Others will benefits from my virtue when I accomplish my goals and continue creating for them. I’ve been too slow with progress because of fear. Fear will never slow me down again. The more I conquer fear, the feeling, not any one substance, the more I can give to people who need what I have to say or may resonate with my message or my art. Jordan Peterson said there are clones of you in the world. What better time to create art when so many people will benefit?”

Present Authoring Virtues: Program Review

I didn’t like the program because I don’t need to think about my virtues. I have a big- ego. But if you’re feeling blue, this program will remind you of how strong you are. Or give you some confidence. Or both.

Some of the virtues were too specific. It was difficult to recall a memory specific to the virtue. This could also be my fault for selecting the wrong virtues from a range of so many choices.

Part of the virtue process felt like mental-masturbation: it’s easy to focus on your strengths but hard to disarm your weaknesses. This felt like a massage for the ego. I wanted to be torn apart and rebuilt.

Final Rating: 2 out of 5

Future Authoring Program

self authoring

Future Authoring Program: Overview

The Future Authoring module of the Self Authoring suite is the best of the collection. The 29.99 cost is worth it for Future Authoring alone.

In Future Authoring, you’re asked to paint a mental picture, through authoring, of the ideal future you want for yourself.

You’re asked to day dream about what the ideal future looks like. This phase is important. Take your time. What do you really want? Don’t think about what you should want, or, what you think others want for you. Think about what activities make you the happiest. Think about the moments in the past you were the happiest. What brought these moments on? How can you re-create the happy moments for your future?

You’re asked to think about the people you admire; the places you want to go; and the goals you want to achieve–probably in more detail than you’ve thought about your future before.

Most people are coasting.

Life happens to them–instead of life happening for them. The future authoring program puts the rest of your life in front of you, instead of trailing behind like a lure dragging on the bottom of a river bed.

Future Authoring Program: Process

Future authoring is broken out into two sections: Creating your ideal future & the goals to get there.

Future Authoring Section 1: Your Ideal Future

First, you imagine your ideal future. Take your time. The more you write about your ideal future, in the highest clarity, the better your vision will become and the more likely your future will materialize.

After that: what’s one thing you could do better? Many people have futures they want but don’t do anything to move towards them.

Next, you write about different components of your future life and how they fit in to your vision. These components are:

  • Social life
  • Leisure or play time
  • Family life
  • Career

The next request from Future Authoring is figuring out qualities you admire about others. You’re asked to pick 2-3 people whom you admire and why. These people are models for your life and they’ll likely have a similar life to your ideal future life.

The last step in the future authoring program is writing about your ideal future with perfect clarity. And writing about the future you want to avoid. Writing about the worst-case scenario for your future is gratifying. It’s difficult to relax, while you know you should be working, when you have a clear picture of what will happen if you don’t achieve your goals.

Future Authoring Section 2: Goal Setting

To achieve your ideal future you need to accomplish goals. Before you can accomplish goals, you need to set them. Clear goals. Unambiguous goals; because ambiguous goals cover your target in a layer of fog, so, you don’t know where to aim, or how to measure your progress towards your destination.

You begin by listing 6-8 goals: A title, and why the goal is important to your future plans. One of mine was becoming an inventor.

Next, you’re asked to prioritize your goals on a number rating from 1-8, or however many goals you selected to author.

After that, you’re asked to evaluate each of your goals against the following criteria:

  • Consider the broad personal and social impact of your goals
  • Consider the detailed strategies for goal success
  • Identify potential obstacles in your way
  • How You’ll monitor progress to your goals

This takes a bit of time because each goal you addressed in the beginning of the second phase of future authoring runs through the considerations above. You’ll write a few-thousand words for each goal, for each consideration. This is the last phase before the conclusion. Then you receive your final results.

Personal-Example Essay:

This is a response from my Future Authoring Essay. Nothing omitted.

evaluating your motives – inventing

For this goal, you might want to consider issues such as the following:

  • Do you truly believe that pursuing this goal is important?
  • Would you feel ashamed, guilty or anxious if you didn’t?
  • Do you want to achieve this goal personally, or are you doing it to please someone else? (It is often a good thing to do something for someone else, but you should know when you are doing that.)
  • Are you pursuing this goal because the situation that you find yourself in seems to demand it?
  • Is the pursuit of this goal enjoyable, stimulating or satisfying?
  • Is this goal part of a deeply felt personal dream?

Please spend a minute or two writing down your reasons for pursuing this goal:

“This goal is truly important. I have inventions in my head that need to be included in the world. This goal is important. It will make money, bring in more freedom, and change the life of others.

If I don’t accomplish this goal I’ll feel terribly guilty. It’s a shame to not give the world what’s in my head. The people need what I have. There will be anxiety if I don’t accomplish these goals because I want my own products. I want to use them because they’ll help my life too.

I’m doing this goal for myself. I think for the money. Or for the challenge. I don’t think I can do it, so I want to do it.

I don’t feel like I’m doing this goal because it’s demanded. I’m doing it because I want to invent. I don’t know if this is enjoyable but I think it will be. I’ll sketch inventions in a notebook then draw them in Cad. I can hire an engineer to work with too.

This goal is part of a dream. I want to be a Renaissance style man who is skilled in many disciplines–like Da Vinci.”

Future Authoring Program: Program Review

What future will work best for you? And, what future do you want to avoid?

Future Authoring asks questions about the future you want and the future you want to avoid–by asking questions. Questions that penetrate deep, deeper than you may have ever considered your life before.

After you visualize your ideal future you set the goals to get there. You’re creating a map to get out of depression and complacency. If you follow the map you’ll get to the destination.

I never thought about my future as much as I have before the Future Authoring Program. This was the most valuable component of the Self Authoring Program. I think there’s value in the program for everyone, even if you’re older and already know what you want to do professionally–you can set personal goals. Or professionally if you aren’t happy.

For the young, Future authoring will set you ahead of your peers. Most young people have no idea what they want to do–they do nothing.

Once you finish the program it’s hard to be lazy. You know what will happen if you don’t work towards your goals. But, you know what happens when you follow your goals too; your best future.

Final Rating: 5 out of 5

Past Authoring Program

Past Authoring Program: Overview

The Past authoring program component of the Self Authoring Suite involves writing your own memoir. Because you can’t get to the destination if you don’t know where you came from, or, what may be holding you back from progressing.

anchor dragging self authoring

Your past can act like an anchor dragging on the bottom of the ocean. You’re a boat. You can move, a little; but pulling the anchor out of the water, a metaphor for a memory or experience you haven’t yet processed will help you progress faster.

The program is designed to create a clear understanding of your past. Jordan Peterson often says writing is thinking. But, no one really writes anymore. Not to themselves anyhow. The Past Authoring Program helps you make a clear sense of your past by writing your own story: chapter by chapter.

Unresolved issues in your past manifest as trauma happening today. You become a slave to events in your past, and, become inundated with habits you don’t really want. Or habits that don’t suite your current position.

Jordan Peterson says this program is the most difficult and most time consuming of all the programs in the Self Authoring Suite. The Past Authoring Program is good for people who have memories that produce negative feelings, memories older than 18 months.

Memories that produce negative feelings such as guilt, pain, or depression–older than 18 months–are not resolved in your brain. These lingering memories are toxic. Your brain hasn’t processed the painful emotions.

Past Authoring Program: Process

The process begins with dividing your life into seven different chapters, or, as Dr. Peterson calls them: Epochs. Epoch means a period of history in a person’s life. Your Epoch-split will vary on the amount of experience you’ve had and how old you are. Try to break up the sections by clearly defined lines of experience. For example, if you’ve lived in multiple places, you could divide your chapters by your different homes. Or, if you’re younger, you could separate your life by school experiences; high school, the different years; middle school elementary school, and so on.

Then you describe in detail, six important experiences from your first Epoch. You’ll repeat the process of authoring six experiences from each Epoch until you finish. The Self Authoring Suite asks for approximately 1000 characters for each experience. You don’t want to write less, because, we’re processing feelings and emotions from the most important sections of our life. The more detail the better.

Once you finish writing six experiences from each of your epochs, all of your experiences are listed on the next page. You’re asked to select ten. Next, you analyze each event and the effects of the event on your life.

Personal-Example Essay

This is a response from my past Authoring Essay. Names are changed.

Community College Epoch – Living with Trevor

Please describe in detail up to six significant experiences that happened to you during this period of your life. You can describe positive and negative experiences. We recommend describing at least four significant experiences from each time period.

For each experience, provide a title (which will be used to refer to this experience later on) and a description of the experience. Later you will explore the impact this experience has had on your life. Here, limit your description to the event itself (approximately 1,000 characters).

“Living with Trevor. His grandma came to visit. Did his mom come? I don’t think so. I never saw his dad. Or his step dad. Did he move there first? I think so. We started good. Then things went downhill. Because I’m critical. I was calling out for help. I think.

I remember when Trevor got his first tattoo. The praying hands on his mid calf. Good tattoo. This was when he went back home to Visit. I smoked with him. I made a big fuss about it because I wanted to be a US Marshal then. I’ve done too many drugs to do it now. I don’t want to either. I like writing.

The apartment was nice. 600$ a month. I had a car, Trevor rode the bus around. I had no thoughts of the future.

You walked in. Saw a couch and a tv. the kitchen had beige counters. Ugly & Peeling. There were ants everywhere. This girl named… Rebecca? Lived by us. She later worked at the LA fitness I worked at in Riverside Someone got her pregnant in college. her up. was years ago. She’s probably doing fine now.”

Past Authoring Program: Program Review

The past authoring program, along with Future authoring, are the best in the Self Authoring Suite. I was amazed, and still am, by how many of my habits, or fears, are lingering cockroaches from experiences in my past I’ve never come to grips with. I know this because while writing I felt negative emotions reliving experiences I’ve hidden in the closet.

Dr. Peterson said the benefits of the Past Authoring Program won’t start to take effect until a few weeks after you finish Past Authoring, while your brain reprocesses the experiences you wrote about consciously.

Past Authoring shouldn’t be rushed.

Instead, Take Past Authoring slowly and carefully consider the experiences in your life most impactful on your behavior today. You can do a lot of good for yourself using the program. Good, that will, potentially, last forever as you slowly unravel a toxic ball of yarn to get to the core of the problem: a memory. Or you.

My only complaint with the Past Authoring Program: many of my experiences had no effect on my life.

For example, I wrote about staying with my Dad at his beach house while I was growing up. A happy memory, but an inconsequential memory nonetheless.

Final Rating: 5 out of 5

More Information on Self Authoring & Final Thoughts

Videos

Self Authoring Discussion | Jordan Peterson & Joe Rogan

Steven Crowder and Jordan Peterson on Self Authoring

Past Authoring Explained | H3 Podcast

Jordan Peterson Lecturing | Self Authoring Program

Storing your results

The Self Authoring Suite is a personal journey to self-discovery; carefully planning the future you want to live and how to get there. It’s best to secure this information–you don’t need, or want, anyone who could want to hurt you to see your deep thoughts or secrets.

Don’t store your results in your Self Authoring account.

Instead, store your results in a flash drive or external hard drive; preferably, your storage device is encrypted too. After, delete your results from the Self Authoring Program–you can take the program again, in another year, and see how your life has changed.

External Hard Drive Recommendations:

Flash Drive Recommendations:

Self Authoring | Final thoughts

It took me about a month to finish the entire Self Authoring Suite. I wrote, estimating, 1-3 hours per week. My total word-count across Self authoring, Future authoring, and Present authoring was 20,000 words.

I never looked at my life in the present this deeply. I never analyzed my past at all.

I had no idea many of my fears were caused from lingering experiences in the past I never dealt with–experiences I’m not yet ready to share publicly, but hope to do so one day.

My future is clear of where I see myself if I do everything correctly because of Future Authoring. It’s a good thing–but–know there’s pressure to do the right thing–where before–there wasn’t any pressure to do anything at all.

If I don’t achieve my goals, I have an idea of where my life will be: the future I don’t want, the future I authored in Future Authoring. But, the future I dream of is within my grasp if I make daily progress towards the goals which will enable my personal-utopia, only a few years away.

I never looked this deeply into my past or thought about my future with this much clarity. The Self authoring Suite was painful.

I hurt. I cried. I realized how broken I was. But now I get to pick up the pieces and move forward.

I’m grateful for the Self Authoring Program and the effect it’s had on my life. If you’re confused about your future: buy it. If you’re hurt over your past: buy it. If you don’t know who you are, right now–get the program. It’s only 29.99 and will have a major impact on you now, and youre future.

Have you completed Self Authoring? Post your experience below.


Purchase the program here

Recommended Next:

Material sourced from the main website

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Mentors & Models: Every Man Needs a Model to Base Their Future Upon https://andreian.com/mentor-models-intro/ https://andreian.com/mentor-models-intro/#respond Thu, 12 Apr 2018 02:28:29 +0000 https://andreian.com/?p=3660 This article is the start of a new series dedicated to mentorship and modeling inspirational  figures. A model helps align your behaviors today, with the person you want to become in the future. All men need a mentor. Unfortunately, a good mentor, who cares, and understands a body of knowledge–enough to pass the wisdom  to […]

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every man needs a mentor

This article is the start of a new series dedicated to mentorship and modeling inspirational  figures. A model helps align your behaviors today, with the person you want to become in the future.

All men need a mentor. Unfortunately, a good mentor, who cares, and understands a body of knowledge–enough to pass the wisdom  to a student is rare. Mentors are hard to come by: but models are everywhere.

A model is an indirect mentor. You see someone; you like their lifestyle. Maybe it’s the rock–Dwayne Johnson; could be Winston Churchill, too. You think: Hey. I like what that guy is doing over there. I want to get there too.

They may have fast cars and mansions; a family, with a few dogs; or, they’re an accomplished artist in a field you thrive on–like writing or film. You’ll find most of the people you want to model exist in a trade you’re fond of.

Your model serves as a lighthouse. Life is confusing. When you’re young; hell, even when you’re old you have no idea what you’re doing. But, you control what you do today. And if you have an idea of what you want your life to be like, or, who you want to be like–your model–You’ll know the decisions you need to make today to get somewhere else tomorrow. Or, where you want to be in ten years.

The series will focus on individuals who achieved great feats.

Greatness, and, what fulfillment means is unique to the individual. You may see an Olympic gold medal as a joke; but having three kids, in a loving, stable home is the greatest aspiration a man can inspire too. Both are valid.

your truth is unique to you.

Your mission is un-explainable; it can’t be compared to another mission–nor will anyone understand the greatness you hope to achieve: why it’s crucial to stop comparing yourself to others and instead compare yourself to the person you were yesterday. And, to never tell your goals to those who don’t have any goals themselves; or people who don’t support you. Losers hate seeing others succeed. They’ll twist your thoughts into a triple sailor’s knot so you can’t make sense of your goals anymore.

You can compare others against one another until, let’s say, six years old–give or take a few years up or down. At some point all human experience diverts and your freedom compels you to different actions than your peers. You’re different. So are your goals an ambitions.

Find a model. Analyze the traits you admire. Build them.

david beckam mentor

Imaginary models & mentors

Your model doesn’t need to be a real person. Stories are as real–if not more real than normal life. Characters like Tony Soprano have a wealth of knowledge embedded in a complex character. Tony, needs to balance his life of crime while trying to be the best father he can be. Complex.

tony soprano mentor

Don’t worry if your mentor is imaginary. Your mentor/model can be animated even. Or a family member. It doesn’t matter. What matters is you select an icon to help you become the greatest version of yourself.

Many people look up to Henry Ford–a business man and the American inventor of the automobile. No one alive today has ever met the man. He’s a character to us today: no different than Tony Soprano.

Examples of upcoming mentors/models

The first post in the series is on David Goggins. The best quotes from some interviews David conducted recently. You can learn a lot about a man’s perspective from his quotes, from his truth.

Watch this video about David Goggins. Real inspiration–not motivation.

Read next:

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Musashi Miyamotos 21 principals for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 21 https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-21/ https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-21/#comments Wed, 28 Mar 2018 19:48:26 +0000 https://andreian.com/?p=3241 This article is the twenty-first Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life. Musashi’s 21 Principles Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi. Never stray from the way. Musashi Principle 21 | Never stray from the way The way is your path. Your mission through life. You need […]

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musashi 21 principles - principle 21

This article is the twenty-first Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.


Never stray from the way.

musashi principle 21

Musashi Principle 21 | Never stray from the way

The way is your path. Your mission through life. You need to spend your life finding the beginning of your path. Then, the rest of your life walking as far as your feet will carry you.

Dedicate your life to finding your path; what you want to master, the activities you want to do until you die.

Once you find your path the next chapter of your life begins: mastering the way–never stray from the way.

Books on Musashi: The greatest swordsman to ever live

Musashi knew from an early age his path was combat. He killed his first man, at the age of 13 in a duel. He dedicated his life to the path guaranteeing his place among legends.

Musashi, on occasion, left his path. But not without purpose. Musashi left his path to teach, or train in an alternative discipline, he knew, would help him later–like calligraphy.

musashi principle 21

All of Musashi’s detours had a benefit to his path. When he left, the intention was to find knowledge, or some tool he knew he couldn’t find on his path to combat mastery.

How Wim Hoff mastered his mind through breathing

Cross training in other disciplines allowed Musashi to evaluate warfare from perspectives other than a swordsman. Like through the eyes of an Artist–or a philosopher. Musashi never strayed from the way. He returned to his path–his home.

Distractions remove warriors from their path

humans evolve at the same rate as their distractions

Humans evolve at the same rate as their distractions. More civilization brings more distraction. And more play. Distractions are like locusts: They multiply and can easily take a driver off the road, and into hell.

Distractions are a virus. Viruses spread and multiply. Video games created virtual reality. Netflix is a product of cable television. Both keep millions plugged into an alternate-reality Matrix, stealing time like a billionaire CEO vampire who found he could stay alive an hour longer for every hour of entertainment consumed.

After embracing the matrix, embracing reality TV and dragon queens, the real world loses its luster like a diamond without a shine.

Entertainment is a trap waiting for your discipline to turn around.

Video games and television are super-normal stimuli engineered to keep you watching, playing, episode after episode; quest after quest. You can’t stop now; four more hours and the show is over.

An entertaining show is a vacuum inhaling millions of hours of productive time, spitting back nothing.

the man who can abstain

Video games used to have an ending. Now, they have loot-boxes and real-world transactions for costumes to put makeup on pixels you never owned.

Video games are a race to whoever can play for ten-thousand hours, or spend ten-thousand dollars, to unlock the coveted golden gun, or golden armor, and become the envy of all the Orcs in Asaroth.

When you leave the game you’re still miserable. But, at least your elf girlfriend tells you she loves you, using the same cadence, every time you log in.

The way is the path to satisfaction – everlasting happiness

life has consequences

Happiness found through pleasure is short-lived. Satisfaction is forever.

accomplishment creates satisfaction: Self-fulfillment through accomplishment, one of the primary tenets of the Andreian Philosophy.

Happiness is a piece of candy; sounds good, tastes good, until you’re fat and alone sitting next to your cat, Roberto, the only friend you’ve known for the past five years.

Satisfaction is toiling on an invention for ten years without reward. On the eleventh year–success. Satisfaction takes longer to build but lasts forever. Happiness, the piece of candy, is here for a moment and leaves an acne-scar behind.

It’s easy to get a job. It’s hard to be Steve Jobs, convincing your neighbor while he checks his mail, you’re inventing a product that can hold thousands of songs in your pocket when most people still organize their music in a CD tower.

Steve jobs is made. A job is accepted, like accepting a piece of candy.

social distractions from the path

social media abuse

Drinking, gossiping, chasing girls. The news & politics; the worst offenders.

Oh Musashi, great warrior above, sharpening your swords on a whetstone preparing to kill another cocky challenger, inspire us to turn our backs on distractions while we travel down our paths to glory.

Be wary of the distractions vying to kick you off your path like the backstep of a horse.

It’s easy to spend your twenties drinking and partying–that’s why most people do it. It’s easy. Drinking catches up to you–thirty years old, fat, single, broke, balding–without status or purpose.

Distractions from your path are like the Sirens who tried to lure Odysseus and the Argonauts into the coastal rocks while they sailed the world seeking adventure, taking the men off their path, and into certain death; the Sirens in Homer’s story are a metaphor–for distraction.

Get The Odyssey For Free Here

Distractions are a lethal threat to your success. Everywhere you go–distraction waits–you killed John Wick’s dog; he wants your life.

Even your tools are fighting to distract you. Your phone is the worst offender. Inside your pocket, or, in your hands; right now, is the ultimate distraction and your greatest weapon.

If you use your phone to learn, you’ll become better than the average man who uses his phone to play Vegas slots–because he thinks he’s earning free perks, but really, he’s making the casino’s money because of ads.

How to stay on the path

Musashi dueling

Find your purpose.

Tend to it every day. If you don’t know your purpose–look until you find it. You’ll know because it’s all you’ll think about. Every night, falling asleep having wet-dreams about your purpose and not your wife.

Set clear goals.

Ambiguous goals are seldom accomplished. You can’t hit a target while it’s covered in a thick layer of fog–fog is ambiguity.

Create rewards for yourself.

You can’t be disciplined all the time; but you can most the time.

Life is for your enjoyment.

Earn your pleasures through your work, and you won’t poison your hard-fought discipline.

Create bounties for each challenge on your path.

After accomplishing a milestone, give yourself a reward you actually want–like permission to play a video game; five rest days; a vacation; or a new car–if you’ve earned it.

The path to mastery will give you more satisfaction than anything else you’ll experience.

Find your path–follow it–reward yourself. This concludes Musashi’s 21 rule series.

Read the full series here.

Musashi Principle 21 | Never stray from the way


This article is the twenty-first Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.

The post Musashi Miyamotos 21 principals for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 21 appeared first on Andreian.

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Musashi Miyamotos 21 principals for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 20 https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-20/ https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-20/#respond Wed, 28 Mar 2018 18:00:24 +0000 https://andreian.com/?p=3240 This article is the twentieth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life. Musashi’s 21 Principles Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi. You may abandon your own body but you must preserve your honor Musashi Principle 20 | You may abandon your own body but you must preserve […]

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musashi 21 principles - principle 20

This article is the twentieth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.


You may abandon your own body but you must preserve your honor

musashi principle 20

Musashi Principle 20 | You may abandon your own body but you must preserve your honor

Honor transcends the body

Your legacy will live forever if you build it high enough. Kiss the sky with your tower; the work you do today can influence the world for thousands of years.

You may spend your entire life toiling, but never see the result in your lifetime. That’s fine. The purpose of work is meaning–not results. The joy of creation; satisfaction after accomplishing previously impossible feats. Every challenge is impossible until you prove yourself wrong.

Vincent Van Gogh, the artist, cut off his earlobe. Why? No one knows–except Vincent. His body meant nothing to him. His art; everything.

vincent van gogh ear

Paintings of Vincent depict him with a bandaged ear. He incorporated his damaged meat-vehicle into his work. Vincent’s madness, only he understood; no one else. He followed no man. He followed his muse and created without reward until he died–a good life for an artist.

Never forsake your honor

never forsake your honor

Honor is a metric for how much you can trust yourself. An honorable man can rely on himself. Others can rely on an honorable man.

A dishonorable man cannot be depended on. He can’t depend on himself. His family can’t rely on him either; like a drunken Irish father in a Frank Mccourt biography.

Dishonorable men betray themselves for pleasure–drinking at the bar–instead of using factory wages to buy food. Dishonorable men understand what they should do, but, do the opposite instead, or, what their dicks command.

Honor determines how much you can depend on yourself taking the right action, for yourself.

If you lie to yourself: You can’t trust yourself. If you can’t do that, you have nothing except the empty shell of a man, still a boy, who never left the nest; seeking more nipples to feed on.

Honor means doing the right thing even if what you need to do isn’t pleasurable.

Honor lost can never return.

depression without honor

Dishonor is a scar carved deep into the skin with your hand, using a rusty butterknife the color of a shovel left out in the rain since the 30’s.

Lost honor never heals, and, is rarely forgiven, even with the help of therapy. Lost honor is never forgotten–the opportunities missed because fear pulled your shirt over your eyes.

You’ll never forget the girl you slept with in college who weighed more than Willford Brimsley, the Diabetes man, after a Sunday spent clearing out a Country Kitchen Buffet.

You can’t forget the times you betrayed yourself; your body won’t let you.

You can buy anyone–except the honorable. Everyone has a price, except the honorable man. This man cannot be bought and will not break before any challenge. He may fail. Soon, you’ll see him again; honorable men don’t know how to quit.

You gain honor by never lying to yourself; picking challenges you care about; finishing them.

hate yourself or love yourself

alex faichan

The honorable man loves himself. But has no ego. Musashi loved himself and took responsibility for his life. He didn’t hand responsibility to an employer; a grown-up babysitter because no one is self-motivated anymore.

Musashi had no competition because no man took as much responsibility for their life as Musashi did.

Honor is staying consistent with your values while the world fights to dismantle them. What matters to you? What do you love? What do you hate? Dishonor is abandoning your values like switching from a flip-phone to a smartphone: It’s hard to go back.

Life to the highest standards you set; never retreat to the comfort of yesterday’s standards. Take steps forward into darkness, fumbling with your matches, trying to make sense of a new world, never explored.

Life isn’t a casual boat ride on an endless river. Get off the track and wander into the forest. Adventure forward. Leave no experiences outside the coffin. Or the urn.

Carry your honor to the grave and you’ll die without regret.

Musashi Principle 20 | You may abandon your own body but you must preserve your honor


This article is the twentieth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.

The post Musashi Miyamotos 21 principals for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 20 appeared first on Andreian.

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Musashi Miyamotos 21 principles for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 19 https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-19/ https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-19/#respond Tue, 27 Mar 2018 15:00:16 +0000 https://andreian.com/?p=3239 This article is the first nineteenth in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life. Musashi’s 21 Principles Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi. Respect Buddha and the gods without counting on their help Musashi Principle 19 | Respect Buddha and the gods without counting on their help The gods […]

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musashi 21 principles - principle 19

This article is the first nineteenth in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.


Respect Buddha and the gods without counting on their help

musashi principle 19

Musashi Principle 19 | Respect Buddha and the gods without counting on their help

The gods help those who help themselves.

The gods help those who help themselves. They ignore the whiny, the sick, the poor and the stupid. The gods encourage the brave–they have no time for fools, whining about their lives, disregarding the gift of life bestowed on the unworthy like a spoiled child at Christmas who didn’t get all the presents on his list. He throws a fit. He wants more gifts.

If you want a better life–make it better. The gods create momentum. You start. They carry.

Once you begin, whatever you want to do and work past an hour, you enter flow; your work becomes easy.

Momentum, like compound interest, is powerful. When an avalanche gains momentum people die; no one can stop an avalanche, like no one can stop you when you’re on a roll, executing your duty like a computer program initiating a self-destruct-sequence. Even death can’t stop your momentum.

Musashi wasn’t religious

musashi wasn't religious

Musashi respected the gods but never depended on them. The gods don’t want your baggage. The gods help the hero who goes farther than the normal man.

Musashi relied on himself. Musashi held himself to the level of a god while staying humble, learning from every teacher along his path.

Most egos are attached to their heart like a parasite boring deeper into the ventricles, circulating life to every limb.

You’ll never be worth a damn if you think you aren’t. The great artists don’t think–they live through their work.

The flow state is divine assistance

Flow is a state of being. You’re challenged–but competent. Flow is the learning place. The realm of true purpose.

Flow is looking up at the clock after an hour of work on Saturday afternoon to see the one hour worked, was actually seven, and now you’re sitting at your desk while the moon illuminates your keyboard at 3 am–the time most normal folk quit drinking.

musashi flow

Flow is divine assistance. The flow state opens when the artist dissolves into their art–letting go of ego–forgetting worldly problems.

Jordan Peterson calls flow: The place between chaos and order in his book: 12 rules for life: An Antidote to Chaos.

Prolific inventors, artists, and entrepreneurs rely on the flow state to produce their best work. Below are book recommendations on flow.

Flow books:

Gods Create.

gods create

Some humans are gods. Gods create. In the beginning, the Bible said God created. Most people stop creating after they put their last colored pencil in their lunchbox after sixth-grade graduation.

People can be gods. Great people bring life into the world, birthed from an idea, from a great mind–no different than the Gods of the people, written by the people. From nothing to everything–from an idea to an iPhone.

You can become a god. The kingdom of heaven exists in the world between chaos and order; not too easy, not too hard, a perfect combination of challenge and familiar, keeping you engaged for hours until the sun peeks out from behind the blinds for the start of your morning. You haven’t slept at all.

The gods helped Musashi because he didn’t ask for it

The gods are cat-like in their nature. Try to touch them and the gods abandon you.

When you’re paying attention, begging, needing, searching for divine intervention you’ll hear no response. The dial-tone is dead. No love-letters in the mailbox kissed by Aphrodite, with a spray of her perfume.

While you’re working, the Gods stand behind your desk-chair, massaging your shoulders, removing the tension from your back–your head feels lighter against your shoulders: the flow state is the quiet divine. The Gods keep your mind centered while in their kingdom. Flow.

Musashi took responsibility

Musashi took responsibility for himself and the gods paid him a worthy allowance.

The more work Musashi did; the bigger the bill daddy took from his weathered, leather wallet to pay the lonely warrior.

The formula is simple: walk farther down the path and earn bigger rewards for your travel. Your destiny is a list of chores created by your parents: mark off all the boxes for rewards beyond imagination.

Musashi Principle 19 | Respect Buddha and the gods without counting on their help


This article is the first nineteenth in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.

The post Musashi Miyamotos 21 principles for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 19 appeared first on Andreian.

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Musashi Miyamotos 21 principles for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 18 https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-18/ https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-18/#respond Mon, 26 Mar 2018 19:40:53 +0000 https://andreian.com/?p=3238 This article is the eighteenth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life. Musashi’s 21 Principles Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi. Do not seek to possess either goods or fiefs in your old age. Musashi Principle 18 | Do not seek to possess goods or fiefs […]

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musashi 21 principles - principle 18

This article is the eighteenth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.


Do not seek to possess either goods or fiefs in your old age.

musashi principle 18

Musashi Principle 18 | Do not seek to possess goods or fiefs in your old age

Live now – not in retirement

You’ll be free when you’re retired–but your body won’t. People eat lies. Once you retire, you can do anything you want.

Wait until your 65 then explore the caverns of Mexico and the prostitutes of Amsterdam. When you’re 45, you need a hip-replacement–Adios Mexico. When you’re 52, you become infertile–goodbye suspect Thai girls.

When you’re 59, you died of a heart attack. No more life; waited too long.

Retirement is a pyramid scheme played against the working man constructed by corporate lawyers who want twenty-five years of your life spent in the same cubicle.

Work for us until you’re 65. We’ll take the best years of your life; we’ll take your energy; we’ll take all of your passion; we’ll take the time you could have spent raising your daughter in exchange for team-building activities and sexual-harassment seminars.

When you’re free to travel the world you won’t want to anymore. All of your energy is gone; your battery has less than 10% left, and your charger broke ten years ago.

The agreement: Dream now, forget later. The slave, freed after decades of torture forgot who he was–forgot his dreams and his ambitions.

Tomorrow may never come

musashi principle 18

Tomorrow isn’t guaranteed. Why live like it is? Retire now.

The word ‘retirement’ is a trick. Retirement means doing whatever the hell you want when you want. You can retire now. Everyone has a passion and a purpose. If you don’t; you haven’t looked hard enough.

Even with life expectancy increasing with modern medicine, you’re better off enjoying the beaches of Greece when you’re twenty-five, not sixty-five–too old to maintain a hard on for longer than it takes to finish tinkling.

People want the art and ideas in your head. Right now. Stop being selfish and give them what you have.

gathering to give away?

What is the purpose of owning anything in your eighties? You won’t have the energy to use your fancy toys. And the government took your driver’s license on your 75th birthday. Now, your Corvette sits in the garage like trying to fuck with a soft dick that doesn’t work.

the elderly musashi 18

Possessions aren’t buried with the owner. Your belongings get distributed to your greedy children while you’re still alive, parked in a wheelchair watching reruns of the same Netflix shows you used to hide away from the world twenty years earlier.

Experience & Memory are forever

Your experiences and memories never leave you. You carry experience beyond the grave. To the next world, if you believe in such a thing.

Near the end of your life, your family plots who gets your collection of priceless vinyl. They’ll argue right in front of you–a ghost before your dead. What daughter gets your wife’s precious jewelry you bought for her every anniversary?

Musashi left this world as he came into it.

musashi answers inside

Musashi created his list of rules for life one week before his death. We don’t know if he gave away his possessions, or, if he had any–but–with the wisdom he delivered–why would he keep anything?

Musashi gave his life to his path. He didn’t care about belongings. Musashi cared about tools and progressing down his path.

Musashi left the world with nothing. No baggage to carry to his next destination. He left the world naked and ready; exactly how he entered it.

Live now. Tomorrow isn’t guaranteed and nothing you own belongs to you. Your life doesn’t belong to you either. You can’t control when you’re ticket gets punched.

Life for today–not for retirement.

Musashi Principle 18 | Do not seek to possess goods or fiefs in your old age


This article is the eighteenth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.

The post Musashi Miyamotos 21 principles for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 18 appeared first on Andreian.

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Musashi Miyamotos 21 principles for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 17 https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-17/ https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-17/#respond Sun, 25 Mar 2018 23:51:40 +0000 https://andreian.com/?p=3237 This article is the seventeenth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life. Musashi’s 21 Principles Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi. Do not fear death Musashi principle 17 | Do not fear death The Samurai do not fear death. Musashi, former samurai; ronin later, didn’t fear death […]

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musashi 21 principles - principle 17

This article is the seventeenth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.


Do not fear death

Musashi principle 17

Musashi principle 17 | Do not fear death

The Samurai do not fear death. Musashi, former samurai; ronin later, didn’t fear death –he couldn’t afford the luxury–his profession was combat. If Musashi feared death like all the men who stood before him; he would have died like them.

The Samurai advise dying over living. Death was the answer to every problem–a ritual passage to another realm. Samurai often followed their master in death by ritual suicide or become hermits and isolate themselves far away from their village. Becoming a hermit was spiritual death. The Former Samurai gives up war, waiting to die somewhere off in the mountains of Japan.

If you fear death you fear living.

You won’t live if you fear death. You can’t carry a love of life while holding a fear of death above your head like a dark cloud waiting to strike lighting at the point of your spine, a wind vane for anxiety.

People who fear death attach to pleasure because pleasure and a fear of death both live for today, to sacrifice tomorrow. Satisfaction occurs when you sacrifice pleasure in the moment for an exponentially better future.

Cowards fear missing out on pleasure. They see work as a waste of time or; they see work as a parent, telling the coward he isn’t good enough.

The coward manifests self-loathing through thousands of hours seated in front of a screen, eating food, clogging arteries worse than a clogged toilet after a night of binge drinking and 2 am Taco Bell.

Fear Death | Or Treasure life

fear death or treasure life

You can’t treasure life holding a fear of death. Let go of any attachments to life and you’ll be free. Don’t forget: One day, you too, will die.

Understanding your mortality isn’t a curse–understanding your death is freedom. Knowing your time is finite, slipping through your hands–going grey, aging; all of this reminds you of the dreams to fulfill before you die.

Live with purpose. Is it better to die, forty years old, with everything you’ve ever wanted checked off; or live until you’re 95, never leaving the five-mile radius of your hometown, with nothing to your name except a gravestone your children visit for a moment on the way to Disneyland?

Men need a war to fight

Men have potential for great power. Deep inside the male barista, stomach full of vegan cookies is a warrior waiting for a calling–the right trigger to light a fuse and detonate.

Without meaning life is meaningless. All men are free to pick their meaning, but choice is frightening; more so than slavery.

Most of the world does nothing. Attaching yourself to a purpose makes your life matter. Some people have kids to have meaning.

A meaningless life manifests externally through pleasure. Alcohol, cigarettes; or worse, vaping–and porn; anything to forget–anything to waste time.

Death isn’t defeat

Death isn’t defeat; fear is defeat. The Vikings believed fear was their enemy. Not Death. Vikings believed in smiling while opponents ripped entrails from their stomachs. The Vikings understood fighting never ends; there is no peace.

picture of an old church

There is conflict and minor periods of peace, followed by war; a permanent cycle of building and crumbling until the final warrior falls, and the last Valkyrie takes the dead warrior to Valhalla as a conscript in Odin’s army.

Fear is the enemy – not death

A good death is honorable. A cowards death is shameful. Fear and anxiety are the enemies of men–not death.

A man throws himself before a speeding car to save a child in exchange for his own life–the man is a hero. There’s no shame in his action; he is brave, and his community will remember him so.

There is shame in doing nothing.

Doing nothing is shameful. Everyone has the potential for greatness and one day, everyone realizes it.

Some people meet their greatness when their young, and live artistic lives normal men dream of. The majority meet their greatness facing their mortality, on their deathbed from old age or sickness, realizing everything they could have been moments before their last breath–hell on Earth.

Musashi did not fear death | He Lived

Musashi killed over sixty men in one-on one combat. At the age of thirteen he killed a man. How does a child slay a man? The child has no fear of death. It may be ignorance, but ignorance can be bliss. Ignorance can save you–Musashi wasn’t taught–yet–everything he couldn’t do.

Musashi was ready to die–so he lived. If you fear death, there’s always a reason to panic. Without the fear of death, panic cannot exist.

You’re free to do everything when you’re willing to die for everything.

This power isn’t inherently good. But it can be used for good. The Firefighter and the terrorist both hold no fear of death. One takes lives–the other–saves them.

Power isn’t bad–Tyranny is. Preparing for your death isn’t bad either. How you live determines how you’re evaluated when class is out. One day, class is out for all of us.

Musashi principle 17 | Do not fear death


This article is the seventeenth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.

The post Musashi Miyamotos 21 principles for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 17 appeared first on Andreian.

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Musashi Miyamotos 21 principals for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 16 https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-16/ https://andreian.com/musashi-principle-16/#respond Sat, 24 Mar 2018 14:00:00 +0000 https://andreian.com/?p=3236 This article is the sixteenth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life. Musashi’s 21 Principles Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi. Do not collect weapons or practice with weapons beyond what is useful Musashi Principle 16. | Do not collect weapons or practice beyond what is […]

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musashi 21 principles - principle 16

This article is the sixteenth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.


Do not collect weapons or practice with weapons beyond what is useful

musashi principle 16

Musashi Principle 16. | Do not collect weapons or practice beyond what is useful

Weapons As tools.

This principle may seem unrelated. Most people don’t need for weapons. Even though the media turns school shooters into A-list celebrities, the world is the safest it’s ever been.

Think of weapons, in Musashi’s context as tools. Musashi’s weapons were his tools.

Wasting potential in a comfort zone

comfort zone musashi 16

If you want to write a novel: write a fucking novel. Taking creative writing classes for twenty hours a week from a failed novelist on the merits of character arcs doesn’t make you a writer: it makes you a fraud–like your teacher. You’ll learn how to become a writing workshop instructor. A failed novelist.

Writing novels is the only way to become a novelist. Nothing will help you succeed except doing what you want to do. The same goes for all other ventures. How are you avoiding what you want to do?

  • Don’t go to business school–start a business.
  • Don’t read books about how to be social–be social.
  • Don’t wait for the right opportunity–Make the right opportunity.

Taking classes seems like a brilliant idea because there isn’t any risk. You won’t feel the cold shiv of failure in your side when someone tells you: “I’m sorry. We’re not interested.” People hide from their dreams because they don’t want to experience rejection along their path to true belonging.

You don’t need much to get what you want

Kelly Slater, surfing god, doesn’t even need a surfboard. He shreds using a dining table. The tools don’t make the player. The experience does. A master transcends tools. He’s better than everyone, regardless of the quality of his tools. The tools become an extension of his hand. The master becomes part of his tool set, merging with the paintbrush, forgetting he exists, living through the art he paints.

A basketball player doesn’t need shoes to practice. He needs a ball. Sure, shoes help, but they aren’t necessary to the purpose. He doesn’t even need a hoop; the player can drill with a ball. How much do you need?

Trim your life down

The more baggage you have, the slower you move. You don’t need a 3ft sword if you understand how to use a 5ft one. This is the basis of a comfort zone. If it’s easy, you aren’t progressing. Easy isn’t adventurous. Easy is baking pies for the adventurer so he can slay the dragon while you slay apple cobbler. Who do you want to be? The supporter, shouting from the stands, or the player, feeding on the admiration of the crowd?

Musashi progressed in levels – leaving lower levels behind

Musashi trained with a weapon until he mastered it. Then the weapon is discarded like Christmas cards from 2007. Next, Musashi finds a weapon he doesn’t know how to use; or a longer sword.

The love of struggle never leaves a true adventurer. Struggle gives birth to meaning. Love your struggle. The common man avoids struggle–he avoids his greatness. The warrior embraces the challenge.

Find your battle and win.

 Musashi Principle 16. | Do not collect weapons or practice beyond what is useful


This article is the sixteenth Principle in the series: Musashi’s 21 principles for life.

Musashi’s 21 Principles

Each principle has its own article expanding upon the wisdom of Miyamoto Musashi.

The post Musashi Miyamotos 21 principals for life (Dokkodu) | principle No. 16 appeared first on Andreian.

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